5 Tips For Branding Your Company On Twitter

Nowadays, you need to dedicate as much attention to your online profile as you do to your storefront.
June 25, 2012

Businesses have found Twitter to be a gold mine for getting their messages to the masses and interacting with customers. With so many people having access to and viewing your profile, it should be consistent with your brand image.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo compares branding on Twitter to a movie trailer. "Movie trailers are the ultimate example of [branding], showing you just enough of the story that you sense the whole and want more."

When someone scrolls through your Twitter feed, they're just getting a portion of the bigger picture.You want them to like what they see and visit your site or inquire for more. Therefore, your brand's Twitter account should align with your service, products and principles.

Here are five tips for branding your business's Twitter account:

1. Have a defined brand voice. When considering the voice of your brand, keep in mind the personality of the company and the audience you want to attract. Does your company make custom skateboards geared towards the younger crowd? Your voice might be laid-back and conversational. Do you sell high-end products geared towards mature consumers? Your voice might be more refined and professional. Consistency is key. If you have more than one person controlling the Twitter account, have a defined set of style rules to follow.

2. Think hard about your Twitter bio: Essentially, your Twitter bio is your "About" page in 140 characters. This means that most of your "About" page needs to be cut down. Consider the most important points of your business. Imagine that you are pitching your company to potentially millions of people, and you have just a couple sentences to do it. This is essentially what you are doing. Always include a link to your website in this section.

3. Choose a background that mirrors the brand: Like your brand's voice, your Twitter background should represent the brand. The best backgrounds feature custom designs or photographs, rather than pre-created templates. Company Twitter accounts, like Etsy, Coca-Cola, Spotify, and ZipCar, all created custom backgrounds that are appealing and resonate with their brands. You should change your background periodically, but keep the same style. For example, when Coca-Cola changes their background, they maintain a consistent "red" theme, in tandem with their company's trademark color.

4. Choose a purpose and stick with it: DisneyPixar primarily uses Twitter to promote upcoming films, whereas Starbucks thrives off of heavy interaction with their customers. Is your primary reason for being on Twitter to inform, to sell, to converse, or a combination of engagement methods? Decide where you fit in, but refrain executing your purpose with a salesman style. What works at the front door won't work on Twitter.

5. Consider keeping a separate account for support: Potential and regular customers are increasingly turning to Twitter to ask for support and guidance about a service. This is why it is helpful to create a separate account for responding to these issues, especially if you are receiving a handful of inquiries. Companies like Etsy and Instagram have separate support accounts to address issues. On the other hand, Travelocity does not, and its feed is filled with responses to customer issues. While this speaks volumes for a company's customer service integrity, it interrupts the flow of conversation and the brand voice that you've created for your business.

How is your business using Twitter?

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