Larry Page and the Law of 10X Success

The past few years in the technology business have undoubtedly been owned by Apple, but Google is making moves to retake its innovation crown.
Managing Editor and Producer, Behance Inc.
February 11, 2013 The past few years in the technology business have undoubtedly been owned by Apple, but Google is making moves to retake its innovation crown. WIRED's profile of Google CEO and co-founder Larry Page makes a case that Google is positioned to snatch the headlines back from its Silicon Valley rival by creating a culture of bold ambition. From the profile:
Larry Page lives by the gospel of 10x. Most companies would be happy to improve a product by 10 percent. Not the CEO and cofounder of Google. The way Page sees it, a 10 percent improvement means that you’re basically doing the same thing as everybody else. You probably won’t fail spectacularly, but you are guaranteed not to succeed wildly.
Page, of course, has been following his 10x law since the founding of Google:
By the time he got to grad school at Stanford, it was a natural step for him to 10X his potential thesis idea—a tool to annotate web pages—into a search engine that transformed the web and the world. And once Google’s riotously successful ad business provided a plump financial cushion, Page was free to push for innovations that bore only a passing relationship to his core business. Google would build an email service—with 100 times the storage of competitors.
What ideas are you making 10 times better?

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Sean Blanda is the Associate Editor of 99u.com. You can follow him on Twitter.

Photo: Google 
Managing Editor and Producer, Behance Inc.